A van carrying students from Ohio University attempt to get into position to view a large thunderstorm near Logan, N.M. on May 15, 2018. The class, led by Jana Houser, assistant professor of meteorology at Ohio University, allows meteorology students to take a weeklong road trip through the central Plains of the U.S. to observe severe weather. 

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 Students observe a vibrant rainbow and cloud formations after a multicellular storm swept through Canyon, Texas on May 15, 2018.

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Ian Bailey checks a weather surveillance radar app as the class chases a supercell storm on May 17, 2018 near Guymon, Okla. Weather radars are used to locate and analyze different types of precipitation, which can help determine a storm’s structure and its potential to grow into severe weather.

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Andrea Lorek (left), Madison Swan (center) and Jake Niederbaumer observe mammatus clouds after a multicellular storm in Canyon, Texas on May 15, 2018. These clouds are characterized by rounded, sack-like protrusions that give them their name, as they resemble a cow's udder.

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Students gather around as Jana Houser updates the class on the current weather forecast on May 16, 2018 near Canyon, Texas.

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Students eat lunch in Amarillo, Texas before getting back on the road to chase a building storm in North Texas on May 16, 2018.

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James Foster uses a handheld anemometer, a device used to measure wind speed, while the class observes a slow-moving, low-precipitation supercell storm near Dallam County, Texas on May 16, 2018. 

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Students unpack the vans after arriving at their hotel for the night on May 16, 2018 in Burlington, Colo. At the end of a long day, the class often drives for many hours in order to be in a better chasing position the following morning.

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Ian Bailey (left) and Alec Prosser pack up at their hotel in Hays, Kan. before another day of storm chasing on May 19, 2018.

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Dark sky can be seen out of the window as the class chases a high precipitation supercell storm near Guymon, Okla. on May 17, 2018. Heavy precipitation can often make it hard to spot tornadic activity within a storm and make storm chasing more dangerous due to low visibility.

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The class stops to observe a supercell thunderstorm near Guymon, Okla. on May 17, 2018. On the thunderstorm spectrum, supercell storms are the least-common type of thunderstorm. They are prone to producing severe weather such as violent winds, large hail, or tornadoes. Most thunderstorms can be classified as either single cell, multicell or supercell.

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Kevin Thiel (left) and Conor Belak (center right) practice their forecasting skills and lead the class through the morning weather briefing on May 18, 2018 in Guymon, Okla.

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Alec Prosser (left), James Foster and Jana Houser, discuss the best storm cell to chase as the class stops to reassess the target on May 18, 2018 in Garden City, Kan. Houser has been chasing storms since 2004. “There is a mysticism surrounding the idea of being a storm chaser; you see all of these really cool videos on YouTube where people are getting really close (to tornadoes). While that happens, it is usually only a really small percentage of the time, maybe only 2 to 5 percent of the time.”

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Christine Aiena observes a supercell storm forming a mesocyclone, which is the region of rotating air in a thunderstorm where a tornado can develop, on May 18, 2018 near Scott City, Kan.

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Students keep an eye out for a wall cloud as they observe a supercell storm on May 18, 2018 near Scott City, Kan.

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Lightning strikes down the road as the class observes a supercell storm on May 18, 2018 near Scott City, Kan.

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The class raises a toast to a great trip at dinner in Edmund, Okla. on May 19, 2018 after their last day of chasing.

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